Home > Sports > Basketball
  print button email button

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

News photo
Cat scratch fever: The Kentucky Wildcats lost to Vanderbilt in the SEC Championship but still earned the overall No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament. AP

Kentucky, Syracuse, N. Carolina, MSU No. 1 seeds in tourney

AP

NEW YORK — Kentucky, Syracuse and North Carolina tried to manufacture some chaos before the brackets came out. Like a group of 213-cm forwards roaming the middle, the members of the NCAA selection committee simply swatted all that noise away.

Even though they lost over the weekend, the Wildcats, Orange and Tar Heels turned out to be what they thought they were: top seeds — all armed with a well-timed bit of humble pie as they gear up for a run through the NCAA tournament they hope will end at the Final Four in New Orleans.

"It's done now," Kentucky coach John Calipari said of the 24-game winning streak that ended Sunday with a surprising loss to Vanderbilt in the SEC tournament final. "Now let's just go onto these three weekends. We've got a weekend in front of us. It's going to be a bear. Know what? Good. Throw anything you want to at us."

Michigan State earned the last No. 1 seed and was the only one of the four top-billed teams to win its conference tournament. The Spartans defeated Ohio State 68-64 in the Big Ten title game Sunday — a contest widely viewed as the game for the last No. 1 seed, even if selection committee chairman Jeff Hathaway wouldn't quite go there.

"As it turned out, this game put the No. 1 seed into the field," he said.

While No. 2 seeds Kansas, Duke, Missouri and Ohio State wonder whether they could have been rated higher, teams such as Drexel, Seton Hall, Mississippi State and Pac-12 regular-season champion Washington curse what might have been. Those bubble teams were left out, and all will be wondering how Iona, California and South Florida made it.

The Big East led all conferences with nine teams, including defending national champion Connecticut, a dangerous No. 9 seed, conference tournament winner Louisville and, of course, Syracuse, which cruised through most of the season with only one loss.

"I think it's going to help us a little bit," coach Jim Boeheim said of the second defeat, Friday to Cincinnati in the Big East tournament. "I think players, when they're winning, they kind of excuse their mistakes. I think we finally got their attention. I think they'll be a better team going forward than they were last week."

There were 11 at-large teams from the so-called mid-major conferences, four more than last year and the most since 2004 when 12 made it. Though the committee claims not to consider a team's conference when it picks the bracket, this was nonetheless a nod to the free-for-all this tournament can be. Last year, 4,000-student Butler finished as national runnerup for the second straight season, while VCU, of the Colonial Athletic Conference, went from one of the last teams in the newly expanded, 68-team draw, all the way to the Final Four.

Who might this year's VCU be?

It's the question being asked across the country, as those $10 and $20-a-pop brackets start getting inked in at spring training sites, corporate board rooms and everywhere else across America. The tournament starts Tuesday with first-round games and gets into full swing Thursday and Friday, with 64 teams in action.

"There were 112 teams with more than 20 wins," Hathaway said. "We talked a lot about parity at the high end of the field and about quality throughout the field. Bottom line, it was about who did you play, where'd you play them and how did you do?"



Back to Top

About us |  Work for us |  Contact us |  Privacy policy |  Link policy |  Registration FAQ
Advertise in japantimes.co.jp.
This site has been optimized for modern browsers. Please make sure that Javascript is enabled in your browser's preferences.
The Japan Times Ltd. All rights reserved.