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Thursday, Sep. 29, 2011

Crittenton gets bail in murder case

AP

ATLANTA — A judge took the rare step Tuesday of allowing former NBA player Javaris Crittenton, charged with murder in a drive-by shooting, to go free on bond after hearing friends and coaches testify that he was too focused on making a comeback to squander his future on a revenge killing.

News photo
Give me that thing: Indiana's Tamika Catchings (top) and Atlanta's Lindsey Harding battle for the ball during Game 3 of the WNBA Eastern Conference finals on Tuesday in Indianapolis. Atlanta won 83-67. AP

Magistrate Judge Karen Smith Woodson took the unusual step to grant him $230,000 bond over the objections of prosecutors, who said they feared Crittenton could threaten witnesses who implicated him in the Aug. 19 shooting death of 22-year-old Julian Jones in Atlanta.

The judge, though, banned Crittenton from the crime scene and ordered Paul Hewitt, who was coaching Georgia Tech when Crittenton starred there, to co-sign the bond with others who spent hours testifying on his behalf Tuesday.

The former first-round draft pick for the Los Angeles Lakers, who was suspended from the NBA after a locker room dispute with ex-teammate Gilbert Arenas, was arrested Aug. 30 at a southern California airport and charged with the shooting.

Police said Crittenton was retaliating for being robbed of $55,000 worth of jewelry when Jones was mistakenly hit by gunfire while standing outside her house with a man who wasn't injured, 18-year-old Trontavious Stephens.

Atlanta Police Det. James Thorpe testified that police charged Crittenton after Stephens identified the player as the shooter in a photo lineup. Thorpe said investigators were told by Stephens that he had a "good, clear look" at the gunman because he stuck his head out of a dark SUV from the back seat.

He also said a neighbor who had spotted Crittenton in the neighborhood searching for the jewelry thieves told police that Crittenton was the gunman, according to authorities.

Defense attorney Brian Steel said the charges were based on faulty eyewitness testimony and that no physical evidence linked the player to the shooting.

Police haven't located blood or DNA evidence. His fingerprints weren't found in the black SUV he rented hours before the shooting took place, and tests for gunpowder residue are still pending.

Steel also disputed assertions from authorities who said Crittenton stuck his head and arms out of the back of the vehicle. He noted that the window of the black Chevrolet Tahoe he was accused of riding in only gave him about six inches of space.

"There's no physical evidence," Steel said. "There's no gun. There are no confessions."

Crittenton's friends and family, who packed the courtroom and a nearby overflow area, said he was too busy training for his return to the league to worry about stolen jewelry.

His longtime friend Darryl Slack said Crittenton made it his mission in life to be on an NBA roster, and his agent Mark Bartelstein testified that his client had turned down offers to play overseas so he could try out for a few NBA squads when the league's lockout ended.

"He was really focused. He had something to prove," Bartelstein said.

Rose speaks out

AP

Chicago — The way Derrick Rose sees it, the NBA lockout is unnecessary and he will consider playing overseas if it drags on.

For now, the Chicago Bulls' star hopes the season can be salvaged, but he also made this clear.

"There's no reason why billionaires and millionaires should be arguing about money," he said. "There are other things in this world that we should be arguing about, but money shouldn't be the problem."

While negotiators for the league and players met Tuesday in New York hoping to move closer to an agreement, the league's reigning MVP was unveiling restored courts at his boyhood playground on Chicago's South Side.



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