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Sunday, March 5, 2006

CHANNEL SURF

TBS's 'Kodai Hakka-tsu Mystery' reveals secrets to an ancient civilization and more

On Monday, March 6 at 9 p.m., TBS will present a two-hour documentary program on the recent discovery of an ancient civilization. "Kodai Hakka-tsu Mystery (Prehistoric Excavation Mystery)" follows an international team of archaeologists, including artist and Rikkyo University professor Katsuhiko Hibino, to South America.

The northern plains of Bolivia were once considered too harsh for human habitation, but recent expeditions have discovered traces of an ancient civilization comprising almost 20,000 separate archaeological ruins, including manmade hills containing coffins and human remains.

Scientists have since concluded that this civilization could prove to be larger than any other prehistoric one in the Americas, but it will take many years to unravel the mystery.


Of all the films he directed, "Banshun (Late Spring)" (1949) was said to be the favorite of the late master Yasujiro Ozu. The story was probably the closest to his own heart. Ozu lived with his mother his entire life, and the heroine, Noriko, lives with her widower father, Shukichi. This week, Nihon TV's "Drama Complex" presents a remake of the classic with Kyoka Suzuki playing Noriko, Kyozo Nagatsuka as Shukichi, and Kon Ichikawa directing.

Noriko, who is past prime marriageable age, has made up her mind that she will take care of her father the rest of his life, a possibility that troubles Shukichi, since he still believes Noriko would be happier in the long run if she married. He thinks that one of his subordinates, Sugiyama (Toru Nakamura), would make a fine match with Noriko and tries to bring the two single people to some kind of understanding. However, Noriko resists, but not because she finds Sugiyama (who, in the Ozu original, was compared in looks to Gary Cooper) objectionable. She simply believes that her father cannot live without her, and recoils at the thought of a widower remarrying, which is something he has in mind.


It seems that every time a high-profile baseball star gets married, it's to a television presenter. This week on the variety show "Junk Sports" (Fuji, March 12, 7:58 p.m.), several female presenters and tarento discuss their experiences covering sports events and male athletes, focusing on anecdotes with a slightly racy implication.

For example, Chinatsu Wakatsuki, who is the emcee for a horse-racing program, talks about how she was once "attacked" by a baseball player she was interviewing who later gave her a baseball that not only had his autograph, but also his phone number.

Sexy idol Eiko Koike reveals how she once had to cover a K1 fighter who gave her a demonstration of his "fighting technique" that sent her to the floor.



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