Japanese Language School Directory

Study Japanese with schools you can trust

 

Information from the Immigration Bureau related to the Great East Japan Earthquake


UPDATED September 15, 2014

Shinjuku Japanese Language Institute

Visualize Your Japanese

With 39 years of experience, Shinjuku Japanese Language Institute provides you with a unique and original learning method. By using differently shaped and colored cards, which represent different parts of speech, students will be able to speak with confidence, construct complex sentences and understand both formal and informal conversation. As of just last year, our diverse student body — representing more than 38 countries — can now access online our new digital contents (Visual Learning Japanese) and check lesson contents anytime, or use vocabulary and grammar apps offline. So why not come and Visualize Japanese with us!


- Weekday intensive Japanese language course
- Business, tourism and Japanese teacher training courses
- Evening, Sunday and private courses
- JLPT, EJU and university preparation courses
- A number of cultural activities throughout the year

Photos from SHINJUKU JAPANESE LANGUAGE INSTITUTE


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Address:
2-9-7 Takadanobaba, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-0075
TEL:
03-5273-0044
E-mail:
jimu_sng_1975@sng.ac.jp

Academy of Language Arts

JAPANESE FOR COMMUNICATION!!

Founded in 1984, Academy of Language Arts (ALA) is located in the heart of Tokyo and renowned for its history. Enhancing learners' conversation skills has been our main educational objective since our foundation. In our general conversation course, learners study in a relaxed multinational environment. ALA is a highly reputable language institute that specializes in business Japanese training, develops and conducts the TCCB (Business Communication Measurement Test). We offer a multitude of programs to meet your goals. Hone your business Japanese skills with our private and company lessons. Whatever your language goals may be, ALA will help you reach them!


- Short-term conversation course (Intensive / part-time)
- Student visa acquirable course (Intensive / 6 months ~)
- Private lessons/In-company lessons (General / Business)
- Business Communication Measurement Test (TCCB)
- 外国人社員育成コース

Photos from Academy of Language Arts


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Address:
2-16, No.2 Tobundo Bldg., Ageba-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo
TEL:
03-3235-0071
E-mail:
info@ala-japan.com

Tokyo Central Japanese Language School (TCJ)

Let's study "real-life" Japanese with friends from 30 different countries!

Established in 1988, Tokyo Central Japanese Language School (TCJ) has been engaged in "cross-cultural communication" through Japanese-language education. Students will get to study in the same building as Japanese students who are studying to become Japanese teachers. It's a great environment for those learning Japanese! We are conveniently located only one minute from Shinjuku Station. You can choose from several courses and curricula are designed to match a variety of needs. Get in touch to arrange a trial lesson and take a test to check your level — both are absolutely free!


- Daily Course / Mon.-Fri. Morning or Afternoon
- Business Japanese Course / Tue. & Thu. Evening
- JLPT Special Prep Course / Sat. Afternoon
- Private Lesson
- International Student Course (with Student visa)

Photos from Tokyo Central Japanese Language School (TCJ)


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Address:
1-17-1-7F Nishi Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-0023
TEL:
03-3342-8001
E-mail:
info@tcj-nihongo.com

KAI Japanese Language School

KAI makes you improve real communication

Founded in 1987, KAI Japanese Language School is a reputable Japanese language school in Tokyo certified by the IALC (International Association of Language Centres). Since our foundation, we've attracted students from about 40 countries all the time, who use Japanese as the common language of communication both in and out of the classroom. At KAI, students live Japanese! Our three main programs cover most comers. First, the General Course, targeted at students aiming to master Japanese. The Practical Conversation Course is a conversation program on a shorter-term basis. The Business Japanese Course is perfect if you're serious to work in Japan.


- General Course to improve Japanese with balance.
- Business Japanese Course 200 if you're serious to work in Japan.
- Practical Conversation Course to focus conversation.
- Summer courses for conversation and JLPT.
- Student visa applications are being accepted.

Photos from KAI Japanese Language School


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Address:
Miyuki Bldg., 1-15-18, Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-0072
TEL:
03-3205-1356
E-mail:
admission@kaij.co.jp

ARC ACADEMY Japanese Language School

Conveniently located near major stations

Since it was established in 1986, multinational students from more than 50 countries have studied at ARC Academy. Our well-trained and motivated teachers help students master communication skills as naturally as possible through realistic intercultural communication. The lessons include not only the language but also how and in what manner the sentences are used in different situations. Our schools in Shibuya, Shinjuku, Yokohama, Osaka and Kyoto are all conveniently located close to major train and subway stations and offer various courses according to students' needs. Our friendly English-speaking staff will be happy to assist you in finding the right course.


- Intensive Course from 4 days to 3 months or longer
- Business Japanese Class in Shibuya
- Private Lesson at our schools/in your office
- Customized training programs for corporate clients

Photos from ARC ACADEMY Japanese Language School


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Address:
2-14-7 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002
TEL:
03-3409-0391
E-mail:
shibuya@arc.ac.jp

Evergreen Language School

Founded in 1949

So far, Evergreen has accepted students from 70 countries and most of the graduates have gone to college and universities for further study. Some have gone into business and have been successfully working for Japanese and foreign affiliated companies. Others have been contributing to their countries working for their government or established their own companies after returning to their homeland. April course student visa registration open!! Apply now for the April Course.


- One-Month Internsive
- PRIVATE & COMPANY
- PREP FOR JLPT(N1,2,3)
- Business / Daily Japanese
- Home / Company Lessons

Photos from Evergreen Language School


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Address:
1-21-18 Yutenji, Meguro-ku, Tokyo
TEL:
03-3713-4958
E-mail:
info@evergreen.gr.jp

Nichibei Kaiwa Gakuin
JAPANESE LANGUAGE INSTITUTE (JLI)

School for practical and business Japanese

Founded in 1967 by the nonprofit International Education Center, JLI has attracted more than 7,000 students from over 90 countries. The features of JLI are: 1) stressing Japanese conversation skills with practical application for business and daily situations; 2) utilizing user-friendly original textbooks written in both Japanese and English (Basic to Pre-intermediate); 3) learning Japanese via TV news and dailies, honing writing and presentation skills (Intermediate to Advanced); 4) targeting business-people, families of expats, spouses of Japanese, other adult learners; 5) diverse student body. JLI is conveniently located in the center of Tokyo, a three-minute walk from Yotsuya Station.


Try-out Lesson: You may come and observe the class of your choice for the Regular as well as the Part-time Programs before you sign up.


- Regular Program (Daytime Intensive): Mon. through Fri., 9:00 - 12:20
- Early Morning Course: One or two days a week, 60 min. per lesson
- Afternoon Course: One or two days a week, 90 to 120min. per lesson
- Evening Courses: One or two days a week, 90 to 120 min. per lesson
- Saturday Course: 120 - 180 min. per lesson

Photos from Nichibei Kaiwa Gakuin JAPANESE LANGUAGE INSTITUTE (JLI)


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Address:
1-21 Yotsuya, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo
TEL:
03-3359-9600
E-mail:
jli-info@nichibei.ac.jp

Coto Japanese Language Academy

Coto offers Japanese lessons especially for residents

Coto Japanese Language Academy teaches Japanese to long-term residents of Japan and those on a short stay. Our classes are small, and we use original materials to allow students of all levels to master the necessary daily conversational skills — the kind textbooks don’t teach well. Our flexible system is praised by our students, as they can balance their study into busy schedules. Our mainly Western students are in their 20s, 30s and 40s. With a relaxed environment, Coto is perfect for serious students, and our experienced instructors are friendly and professional. We know you'll enjoy studying with us!


Free level check offered


- 4 Week Intensive Course
- Nihongo Plus! Group Lesson
- JLPT Course
- Private Lesson
- Dispatch Lesson

Photos from Coto Japanese Language Academy


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Address:
4-9-4 Iidabashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo
TEL:
03-6261-4515
E-mail:
info@cotoacademy.com
The Japan Times questioned some international students about studying Japanese.

Shinjuku Japanese Language Institute

Shinjuku Japanese Language Institute
Petit Florian
France

Q1. Why did you start studying Japanese? What is your goal?

I've always been attracted by the culture, customs and history of Japan. After I started to read manga and watch Japanese show, I wanted to see this country with my own eyes.
The things that really made me want to learn Japanese were video games. Ten years ago, good games weren't exported, and the only way to play was to be fluent.

Q2. What are your impressions about the Japanese language?

I started to learn Japanese when I came to Japan, and since then I could see my daily progress.
French expresses feeling so differently from Japanese in talking and writing. When we start to learn, we become more open minded and our way of seeing things changes.

Q3. Do you have any advice for people who want to study Japanese?

Japanese is special and there's a spirit inside we cannot translate into our own. There are expressions, words or proverbs that we can only understand when we speak to Japanese people, go out or eat with and live similar to.
Mastering a language is not only about vocabulary or grammar, but thinking another way. So if I had any advice to give, it would be don't just stay home and meet people from your country, meet Japanese, travel and discover new things and never give up!

ARC ACADEMY Japanese Language School

ARC ACADEMY Japanese Language School
Charles-Andre de Passille
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Q1. Why did you start studying Japanese? What is your goal?

I've always loved Japanese music and I wanted to make connections in the industry here. I started studying Japanese since I arrived in Japan as it was the only way to get around doing what I wanted to do. I hope to achieve native-level fluency within five years.

Q2. What are your impressions about the Japanese language?

By studying a new language, you discover things you didn't know about your own language. Japanese language is a functional-language, if you know how to do computer programming, the logic behind the language kind of resembles it. I'm sure every non-kanji familiar foreigner would have appreciated learning Japanese without going through the scary wall of kanji.

Q3. Do you have any advice for people who want to study Japanese?

It's useless to study for long periods of time. It is much more efficient to set daily goals and achieve them with determination. Simply practicing 15 minutes a day for a week will be more efficient than 4 hours in just one day and nothing for the rest of the week. Learning a language is all about recalling memory power. It's also useful to force yourself to think in the language you are learning. When practicing speech, you're usually translating from your native language to Japanese. Also, we're in 2014, use technology to help you!

Coto Japanese Language Academy

Coto Japanese Language Academy
Simon Wardle
England

Q1. Why did you start studying Japanese? What is your goal?

I first started to study Japanese after I arrived in Japan. Of course I really should have learned some before coming, as that would have helped me get used to life in Japan much quicker.
For the last three years, I have been going to Coto Language Academy to improve my conversation skills.

Q2. What are your impressions about the Japanese language?

My first impression of Japanese was that the way of speaking was difficult to understand and use, as it is less direct than English. Another thing I learned was that onomatopoeic words and phrases are useful!

Q3. Do you have any advice for people who want to study Japanese?

Coto Language Academy is a good way to start learning Japanese, and their Nihongo Plus course is especially useful for understanding and practicing Japanese conversation skills.
Also with Coto Language Academy, there are lots of events to go to and engage with teachers and fellow students in Japanese.

KAI Japanese Language School

KAI Japanese Language School
Ambrois Aurelie
France

Q1. Why did you start studying Japanese? What is your goal?

I've been writing to a Japanese pen pal since I was 10 years old. Through writing to her I became interested in Japan and started learning Japanese for fun while I was a university student in the hope that we would eventually be able to write in Japanese. I later decided to move to Japan and now hope to one day be able to work as a translator.

Q2. What are your impressions about the Japanese language?

When I first started learning Japanese I told everyone who commented on how difficult is seemed that, yes, it is difficult to read and write but the grammar is really easy because there are no articles, genders, cases or plurals, and only two tenses — but as I learned more I realized that it is definitely not the case! I still think it is a challenging yet fun and interesting language to learn.

Q3. Do you have any advice for people who want to study Japanese?

To anyone wanting to learn Japanese, I would say it's important to always practice writing out kanji by hand. It's also a good idea to put yourself in situations where you have to speak, read or listen to real Japanese as much as possible. Don't be put off when it gets difficult and enjoy it!

Tokyo Central Japanese Language School

Tokyo Central Japanese Language Schools
Ambrois Aurelie
France

Q1. Why did you start studying Japanese? What is your goal?

The first time I saw kanji, I was very curious about it and wanted to know the meanings. Also I was very interested in Japanese culture, so I started to learn the language. My goal is to pass JLPT N1, then I'd like to work as a translator or teacher, something related to Japanese language.

Q2. What are your impressions about the Japanese language?

As for grammar, there are many expressions and it's interesting to learn and try to use them. As for kanji, even if I remember them once, it's easy to forget if I don't use them, so I try to review as much as I can. Formal Japanese is the most complicated, but I need to use it correctly as I know it's important in Japanese society.
If you have a passion to learn Japanese, it's not that difficult to acquire.

Q3. Do you have any advice for people who want to study Japanese?

I think it's important to use what you learn outside of school to improve your skills. Now I study at TCJ. At first, I was a little nervous because I had heard the lessons were only in Japanese, however, I am enjoying it now. The teachers are very enthusiastic and richly experienced professionals. They can explain everything using drawing, gestures and easy sentences we've already learned. Now I believe the best way to learn Japanese is directly in Japanese.

Academy of Language Arts

Academy of Language Arts
Lawrence Wong
Connecticut, USA

Q1. Why did you start studying Japanese? What is your goal?

The first chance I had to learn Japanese was when I was studying at a Japanese University's International Student Program that focused on Japanese and judo. My objective was to be able to communicate to the Japanese students and my judo teammates.

Q2. What are your impressions about the Japanese language?

My first impression on learning Japanese was that there were a lot to learn. For example, there are three types of characters for writing (hiragana, katakana, and kanji). Furthermore, there are several levels of politeness depending on who you speak to. I think this is an example of what makes Japanese a challenging and unique language.

Q3. Do you have any advice for people who want to study Japanese?

My advice is to immerse oneself into the Japanese culture and language. Watch as many Japanese TV programs as possible. When learning how to read, don't rely too much on the romaji, this will force you to learn hiragana and katakana faster. Also, try to speak to others in Japanese as much as possible. This will allow you to practice and enforce what you learn from the books. One shouldn't be afraid to make mistakes; you only learn from them and gain valuable experience. Just be patient and have fun.

Evergreen Language School

Evergreen Language School
Mitra Thapa Magar
Nepal

Q1. Why did you start studying Japanese? What is your goal?

When I was a student in high school, I learned about Japan from my seniors, radio, TV and other sources. When I was planning to study abroad, I thought of many countries, but chose Japan after seeing the websites of schools in Japan. My seniors also agreed, so I decided to come to Japan.

Q2. What are your impressions about the Japanese language?

Using sentences of Japanese language is very interesting and learning words to be able to talk and understand is very exciting for me. I also think the politeness of the Japanese language is a good aspect. Although kanji is very difficult to both read and write, I think writing kanji is rather interesting.

Q3. Do you have any advice for people who want to study Japanese?

Learning Japanese is very effective and useful, I believe. Also, Japan is high-tech and the lifestyle is good. In my time here, I observed some specialties of Japanese education and decided to study information technology after language school.
I assume those who study in Japan would have a great future. Students can move ahead toward their future by consulting with schools, colleges, seniors and friends. Consultants in Japan are excellent and do a great job, so try to gain better Japanese language skills.

Nichibei Kaiwa Gakuin

Nichibei Kaiwa Gakuin
Kelly Cargos
Connecticut, USA

Q1. Why did you start studying Japanese? What is your goal?

Like so many others, I first became interested in learning Japanese after reading manga and playing Japanese video games. When I realized that I was enjoying the translated comics and games, I became very curious as to how the original content compared to the English versions. I thought I should study Japanese so I could enjoy the originals. Right now, my short-term goal is to pass N1 on the JLPT. My long-term goal is to be able to read a Japanese newspaper without relying on a dictionary.

Q2. What are your impressions about the Japanese language?

Japanese and English are such fundamentally different languages, not only in terms of grammar and syntax, but also in terms of communication style. On a personal level, I struggle most with kanji and as a result I feel that there is a sizable gap between my speaking ability and my reading and writing abilities. This can be frustrating, but it motivates me to study harder.

Q3. Do you have any advice for people who want to study Japanese?

My best advice is to try as hard as you can to quit the habit of translating back and forth between English and Japanese. If you can make the leap to actually THINKING in Japanese, your fluency will increase dramatically.